A DATE WITH DEATH POSTPONED AT LAST
MINUTE - SUPREME COURT RULES STAY OF
EXECUTION FOR FORMER ARMY RECRUITER
EX-SFC CLEVE FOSTER (NICK-NAMED "SARGE"
ON DEATH ROW) JUST HOURS FROM LETHAL
INJECTION - CONVICTED IN RAPE-MURDER OF
TEXAS WOMAN IN 2002 - APPEAL HAD CLAIMED
RIGHTS HAMPERED BY POOR LEGAL HELP
DURING FOSTER'S TRIAL AND APPEAL PROCESS

Copyright © 2011 MilitaryCorruption.com

The phone call came literally at the last minute for former Army recruiter, SFC Cleve Foster.

Just before the ex-NCO had been scheduled to die Tuesday for the 2002 murder-rape of a Texas woman, the United States Supreme Court ordered a 30-day stay of his execution.

The burly, goateed Foster, who claims he has "found God" since his time behind bars, heaved a sigh of relief that he has won at least a temporary repreive from the execution chamber.

LAWYER'S APPEAL WINS APPROVAL AT SUPREME COURT

Part of his attorney's successful appeal before the high court was based on Texas using a new type of drug in the "lethal cocktail" the Lone Star State now has to dispatch convicted killers to the great beyond. Prior to 1982, an electric chair was the means of execution.

"I didn't kill her," Foster has said from the beginning. He claims he'd had sex with the Fort Worth woman, but was zonked out on sleeping pills by the time his parter in crime fired the fatal bullet into raped and battered "Mary" Pal, originally from Sudan.

The two men had met her in a local bar, then followed the victim in their vehicle after she left for the night.

Somewhere along a deserted road, the attack took place. Foster's semen was found in the victim as well as that of Sheldon Ward. Last year, Ward died of cancer in another prison lockup.

EX-ARMY NCO GREW UP IN HILLS OF KENTUCKY

Foster was born in Henderson, Kentucky and enlisted in the Army with the intention of making it a career. He reached the rank of Sergeant First Class and was a successful recruiter until he was caught having sex with teen-age girls by plying them with booze and drugs.

Court-martial charges were preferred on him, but he never went to trial. The man they call "Sarge" on death row, was barred from re-enlistment, and thus his Army career came to an abrupt and inglorious end.

If the Supreme Court doesn't rule in his favor at the end of the month-long stay, his life will be what comes to a halt, and that's just fine with Texas prosecutors.

Under state law, even if a person doesn't actually kill an individual, if they were physically present at the murder scene, they are just as "guilty" and, therefore, subject to the death penalty.