AIR FORCE ACADEMY CADET HANGS HIMSELF
IN ROOM AT COLORADO SPRINGS - MARC HENNING
FOUND DEAD - NO FOUL PLAY INVOLVED SAYS OSI
"SUPER-ACHIEVER" SAID TO HAVE TAKEN LIFE DUE
TO HEAVY PRESSURES AT AFA - RUMORS ON
CAMPUS THAT CAUSE OF DEATH "AUTOEROTIC
ASPHYXIATION" - INDIANA NATIVE WAS IN SENIOR
YEAR - WELL-LIKED CADET HAS BROTHER WHO
AFA GRAD AND ACTIVE DUTY FIRST LIEUTENANT

© 2010 MilitaryCorruption.com

Marc HenningThe death of a senior cadet at the Air Force Academy has been ruled a "suicide" by the El Paso County Coroner's Office.

Popular Marc Henning, 22, was found near death at the end of a rope in his dorm room around 0245 hours Sept. 15 at the AFA in Colorado Springs. The cadet was rushed to Penrose Memorial Hospital where all efforts to revive him failed. He died a short time after arrival.

The bizarre death (rumors on campus have it Henning may have been practicing the deadly game of "autoerotic asphyxiation") has shocked the Air Force community. Henning was a "super-achiever" and successful in everything he did.

The handsome farm boy with the bright smile and many friends was former executive officer of Cadet Squadron 20 and head manager of the Falcon Football team.

"He had everything to live for," a fellow cadet told MilitaryCorruption.com. "That's why few around here believe the official story that he committed suicide.
What may have really happened is, he died by accident."

GRIEVING MOM ADDRESSES CADETS AT MEMORIAL SERVICE IN CHAPEL

Marc's mother, Linda Henning, fought back tears at a memorial service for her son in the Cadet Chapel. The sanctuary was packed with mourners Sept. 28 as the grief-stricken mother warned them all to "tell someone" if they feel things are getting too much them to handle.

The Indiana housewife said her son was a "gentle warrior" who was deeply moved by the plight of poor Bolivian villagers. He had helped them create a safe, functioning water system, she said.

"As you know, Marc took his own life," Mrs. Henning continued. "We think we know why, but we may never know for sure. We were concerned that he was overloading his plate . . . I think in his mind, he felt he was going out on top."

That last sentence really puzzles us, as does the first one. But let this mother and her husband Van mourn their son without lurid speculation. They are entitled to privacy.

The death of this cadet is a tragedy, not just for his family and friends, but for the Air Force, as we think Marc had what it took to be an outstanding officer. Now, we can only wonder what might have been.