SEAL OFFICER STEALS PATROL BOAT - NAVY
LT (JG) PHILLIP WYNKOOP CONVICTED OF GRAND
LARCENY IN THEFT OF CRAFT AND TRAILER - "I'M
ASHAMED OF WHAT I DID," AFGHAN WAR VETERAN
SAYS - WILL SUBMIT RESIGNATION TO NAVY
SEAL GETS FIVE-YEAR SUSPENDED SENTENCE

© 2012 MilitaryCorruption.com

Hold on. Before the usual suspects write in and accuse us of bashing the Navy's famed SEALS - our recent item on the "official story" of a Navy SEAL commander's alleged "suicide" in Afghanistan caused us to be accused of being biased against the SEALS - wait just a minute.

We have the highest regard for these élite fighters, and respect the many sacrifices they have made, both in training and combat on behalf of our country.

The article you are about to read is written in sorrow that this young officer has suffered from his own poor judgment and obvious depression and now must pay the the price of forfeiting what could have been a promising naval career.

"ASHAMED" OF WHAT HE DID, HE SAYS

LT (JG) Phillip Wynkoop told a judge in Accomack County Circuit Court in Virginia he was very "ashamed" of his actions and was "in a fog" when he committed the act of grand larceny.

What got the 25 year-old junior officer in big trouble was his impulsively stealing an open boat, motor and trailer from the Virginia Marine Resources Commission office at Belle Haven.

Video cameras recorded Wynkoop backing his truck up to the craft and towing the stolen boat away. The SEAL was quickly caught after cops checked out his license plate number and discovered the purloined patrol vessel sitting out in the open at Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek.

Wynkoop is stationed there, after recently returning from combat duty with Seal Team Two in Afghanistan.

SEAL OFFICER GETS FIVE-YEAR SUSPENDED SENTENCE

Such bizarre behavior - Wynkoop made no effort to conceal the craft, nor did he even use it - might be explained by the fact the lieutenant had just been dumped by his longtime girlfriend and suffered from PTSD due to some of his experiences in fighting the war on terror overseas.

Could such a bone-headed stunt been really a "cry for help?" Wynkoop told the court it is "especially difficult" for SEALS, well-known as extremely tough "macho-men" types, to seek psychological help of any kind.

"I don't know why I did it," he said before receiving sentence. The officer got five years incarceration for the felony conviction, but all jail time suspended.

That is little solace for Wynkoop. After all he went through to become a SEAL officer, the Virginia Beach man has submitted his resignation to the Navy.

A heavy price to pay for what he did.